Wednesday, March 25, 2015

JFK Assassination Buffs...My New Title is THE END OF CAMELOT

I've been a HUGE JFK assassination buff since that very day. Everyone who was alive on November 22, 1963 knew exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. I was in my first grade classroom. The teacher got a call on the classroom phone and told us ‘the president was shot.’ A collective gasp went around the room. I was 6 years old and in first grade. It was ten years before I saw the footage of Ruby shooting Oswald, on an anniversary documentary.
But it was my grandmother who got me interested in the biggest mystery since 'who killed the princes in the Tower?' (I'm a Ricardian; that's for another post).  She got me embroiled right along with her.
She listened to all the radio talk shows (those who lived in the New York area might remember Long John Nebel, on WOR, WNBC, and WMCA, all on AM radio (FM was really 'out there' at that time).
She recorded all the radio talk shows. She bought whatever books came out over the years, along with the Warren Commission Report, which I couldn't lift at the time, it was so heavy. But my interest never waned in the 51 years that followed.
In 2000, I began the third book of my New York Saga, set in 1963. The heroine is Vikki McGlory Ward, daughter of Billy McGlory, hero of the second book, BOOTLEG BROADWAY, set during Prohibition. This was my opportunity to write a novel showcasing all my current theories, and continue the saga. It took a minimum of research, since I remember all the 60's brands, (Bosco, Yum Berry, Mr. Bubble...), the fashions, the songs, and I even included a scene set on that unforgettable night when the Beatles first appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964.
The book's synopsis is below. It will be released on April 10 by The Wild Rose Press.
I'd be very interested to hear from other people who remember November 22, 1963, or who would like to talk about anything related to the JFK assassination or what followed.



November 22, 1963: The assassination of a president devastates America. But a phone call brings even more tragic news to Vikki Ward—her TV reporter husband was found dead in his Dallas hotel room that morning.
Finding his notes, Vikki realizes her husband was embroiled in the plot to kill JFK—but his mission was to prevent it. When the Dallas police rule his death accidental, Vikki vows to find out who was behind the murders of JFK and her husband. With the help of her father and godfather, she sets out to uncover the truth.
Aldobrandi Po , the bodyguard hired to protect Vikki, falls in love with her almost as soon as he sets eyes on her. But he's engaged to be married, and she’s still mourning her husband. Can they ever hope to find happiness in the wake of all this tragedy?
 
Pre-order THE END OF CAMELOT for Kindle

First Lines of Book:
Washington, D.C., September, 1959
Vikki McGlory aimed her Smith & Wesson .38 and fired at the metal target.
“Bull’s eye.” She kissed the gun’s warm barrel. A smudged red lip print bloomed against the steel gray metal. 
My Favorite Passage:
Billy came down the stairs for a nightcap and glanced into the living room. He noticed the glow in the fireplace, Vikki’s eyeglasses and the anisette bottle on the table. The couch faced the other way, but nobody was sitting on it. “Where’d they go?” Then he realized they hadn’t gone anywhere—and they were on the couch, but not sitting. Before he got out of their way, he placed a long-playing record on the phonograph. Jackie Gleason’s “For Lovers Only.”
 

19 comments:

  1. Great post. I have to admit I was not alive yet. However, I ddi study this in the political assassinations class I took in college.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was only 6, but I remember the huge impact it had on everyone. The other two events in my lifetime that shocking were the Challenger explosion and 9/11.

      Delete
  2. I'm a huge JFK assassination buff, too, and can't wait to read your book! I watch everything on the History channel or any other channel about the assassination, even though my hubby says: "you're watching that stuff again!" I'm also a Richard III buff, have you read the latest book by the forensic lady who actually found his grave in the parking lot? It's wonderful, I highly recommend it! Wishing you lots of sales!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Hebby, wow, that's great, thanks! I hope you enjoy it. I'd be very interested to hear what you think of the book after you read it. I also just joined a JFK Assassination forum. Will get the link & post it here.
      Ever since it happened, I've watched every show & read every book I could get my hands on about it. Are you a Richard III Society member too? Yes, I read Philippa's book, I met her via Skype when she talked to our New England Chapter not long after they found the grave.

      Delete
  3. We must be the same age because I was in first grade too! I vividly remember that we were making molds of our handprints to paint and give to our parents for Christmas. I remember everyone being sort of stunned. I didn't get really sad until later when we watched the funeral on TV. The fact that Caroline was so close to my age made it have a real impact on me. People always talk about how the world might be different if JFK hadn't been killed. But I saw a show on PBS recently where they discussed his terrible health problems and surmised that he might not have lived that long anyway. Really interesting subject to base a book around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess we are the same age, 57. Caroline is also our age; I was always interested in what she was doing. Right, JFK did have a lot of health problems; he also foresaw his own early death & knew he'd die young. He even predicted someone could shoot him from a building. I always wonder if he'd have been assassinated if he hadn't gone to Dallas that day.

      Delete
  4. I was in the 8th grade (in study hall). It was a hard time and probably the first death blow to my innocence. Even now, when hate has become pretty rampant, I have trouble understanding why anyone would want to hurt anyone else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do remember how stunned everyone was. Also, my Uncle Freddie died the same day. We sure did lose our innocence that day, I've heard 'the 60s started on 11/22/63' and I believe that.

      Delete
  5. I was in the 6th grade and had a male teacher. There was an announcement over our room's loudspeaker for all teachers to report to the principal's office. A short time later, my teacher came in the room. He was crying. All the students were then sent outside for recess. We had no idea what was happening. To see a teacher cry was one thing - to see a male teacher cry was another. I remember we were all scared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, what a story. I think my teacher may have cried, I do know she was stunned with that news. The only other time I saw a teacher cry was in 4th grade, one of our classmates, Steven, died. That shocked me. To hear that another 9-year-old died just knocked me over. That really scared me, too.

      Delete
  6. Sorry Diana, I don't remember that day. But I lived in Dallas for years and have driven by that site many times.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Tina, wow, you lived in Dallas? When we lived in Houston in 1982, I had a friend Charlie who was from Dallas. He took me on the entire tour, from the motorcade route, to the Trade Mart where JFK was going to speak, to Parkland, and to the house where Marina Oswald lived. The Book Dep. Bldg. 6th floor wasn't open to the public yet. I haven't been back there since, but want to go back and see that 6th floor!

      Delete
  7. JFK buffs, I just joined this forum.
    http://www.jfkassassinationforum.com/index.php/board,1.0.html

    ReplyDelete
  8. I was in high school and heard about it from our neighbor who was driving the car pool for lunch that day. We spent the next few days in front of our TV like everyone else and cried as we watched the funeral. Many years later we all cried again when we visited Dealey Plaza in Dallas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rebecca, I don't remember anything about the funeral (tho I remember Bobby's in 68) but visiting Dealey Plaza in 1982 was very moving for me also. I relived that moment, imagining what it must have been like to be standing there hearing those gunshots. It was such a turning point in our history.

      Delete
  9. Folks, if you'd like to take the chat a step further....what's your theory as to who killed President Kennedy? For 50 years I believed it was the mob headed by Giancana, but in the last year I tend to believe it was Oswald alone.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is the book that helped convince me Oswald acted alone:
    http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Harvey-Oswald-Kennedy-Conspiracy/dp/1454912510/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1427724868&sr=1-1&keywords=lee+harvey+oswald+48+hours+to+live

    ReplyDelete
  11. I had just put my second son in for his nap and my mother called me to come downstairs immediately; urgent news. There we watched the motorcade, the shots, the speed up and the limo carrying a dead President Kennedy to the ER in Dallas. Later we saw Jackie's pain when LBJ was sworn in as President. We all felt sorry for the Kennedy family. So unlucky.
    Angela Rosati

    ReplyDelete


  12. Karen Tukovits

    May 1 11:17 PM

    Hi Diana,
    I'm one of the founding members of our Chapter who currently lives in Florida (ask Nora - she knows me well) but I'd like to reply because I lived in N.Y. and worked in Manhattan at the time of the END OF CAMELOT. It's a long time ago, but at that time I worked in a building on Fifth Avenue and the corner of 56th Street and my office was located on the fourth floor with my windows at the corner of the office giving me a partial view of 56th Street on each side of Fifth Avenue as well as several city blocks in each direction. My view included several posh and very expensive, well-known hotels and exclusive shops.
    The streets were filled with people making their way to whatever public transportation they could locate in order to get home; sit in front of a T.V. and find out what was really going on and what was rumor. Most people were already crying at what they were hearing, couldn't believe, and most were certain must be some sort of a mistake. There were more rumors that day than actual deeds perpetrated but much of it seemed to be a case of a great many imaginations taking flight -- at least, that's my take on the situation. If there had been a news person with an ounce of sense instead of trying to create the story of the century, they would have held off until the end of everything before making the final announcement. I mean, nothing was gained by making the announcement immediately, throwing the country into deep despair and mourning for a young, beloved President amidst the furor of a massive manhunt and confusion in every area.
    I remember riding home on the New York subway and with the exception of the grinding sound of the subway wheels on the underground tracks, the only other sound was sniffling and weeping. All businesses were closed for a few days while everyone mourned and followed the funeral procession on television and I think most everybody ended up sharing a piece of their heart with a brave young widow and her two young children.
    I worked at New York's Kennedy Airport for American Airlines also, among a number of interesting positions at various entities. I was a ticket agent, a ground hostess and I flew several flights as an on the spot fill-in flight attendant when they got a last minute sick call. That wasn't a regular thing -- just every now and then.
    Well, I hope I haven't bored you to tears and that some of this may be helpful. Should you need any info on a subject in the future, give a holler and if I can help, will be glad to do so.
    Karen Tukovits

    ReplyDelete